Category Archives: Emerging African middle class

The myth of the trickle-down effect: What Guinea’s recent upheavals intimate about the country, by Joschka Philipps

The dry season’s dust has again settled on Conakry’s streets, aside from a few marks of ashes and rubble on the sides of the main avenues, everything seems to be back to the bustling normal. Just about ten days ago, … Continue reading

Posted in Economic Development, Education, Emerging African middle class, Fragility, politics, Popular Uprisings, Urban issues, Youth | Tagged | 1 Comment

Rejoinder to Utas on the emerging Liberian middle class, by Ilmari Käihkö

In an earlier blog post, Mats Utas discussed the emerging Liberian middle class.[i] I found this text both refreshing and intriguing, and was asked to offer a written response to it. I hope it succeeds in developing some of the … Continue reading

Posted in Emerging African middle class, Governance | Tagged | Leave a comment

Liberia, the emerging middleclass and tiny bits of tension

He looks very frustrated behind the steering wheel of his SUV. He is making his way over the sandy road; crisscrossing between the people walking from the beach. There are many close escapes as his car skids in great speed … Continue reading

Posted in Emerging African middle class, Governance, Humanitarian aid, Post Conflict | Tagged | 1 Comment

The world downside up, by Lisa Åkesson

Mainstream European media portrays Angola as a country characterized by extraordinary economic growth, widespread corruption, a questionable democracy, a state totally dominated by the ruling MPLA party and glaring inequalities between the poor and the rich. This is a valid … Continue reading

Posted in Emerging African middle class, Migration | Tagged | 1 Comment

The new sterile and faceless Africa?

Finally I got the chance to see Jens Assur’s photo exhibition Africa is a Great Country at Liljewalchs in Stockholm. There have been a lot of discussions concerning the provocative Africa-is-a-country  title and this has partly overshadowed the content. Is … Continue reading

Posted in Emerging African middle class, Images of Africa, Journalism, Postcolony | Leave a comment